Issue 117, 3 December, 2001

Table of Contents
============================================================================
1. Finding of the Solar and Heliospheric Management and Operations Working
Group (SH-MOWG), Passed November 30, 2001
2. First Announcement and Call for Abstracts for the April 2002 EGS General
Assembly Session ST17.2 “Thin Magnetospheric Boundaries “
3. First Announcement and Call for Abstracts for the April 2002 EGS General
Assembly Session ST2 “Space Weather”
4. Storms in Space – the Book
============================================================================
* Please direct all replies to editor@igpp.ucla.edu *
* !!!! DO NOT send any message to agu_spa@igpp.ucla.edu !!!! *
****************************************************************
SPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPA
*
* * * . . . . . . .
* * * AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION .
* ***** * . .. . . . . . . . .
* ********* * SPA SECTION NEWSLETTER . ..
*********** . . . . . . . .
* * *********** * * Volume VIII, Issue 117 . o .
*********** . . . . . . . .
* ********* * 3 December, 2001 . ..
* ***** * . .. . . . . . . . .
* * * Editor: Guan Le .
* * * Email: editor@igpp.ucla.edu . . . . . . .
*
SPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPA

——————————————————————
1. Finding of the Solar and Heliospheric Management and Operations
Working Group (SH-MOWG), Passed November 30, 2001
——————————————————————
From: Dana Longcope

The Solar and Heliospheric MOWG met in Washington, DC on November 16, 2001.
During this meeting it drafted the following finding.

Importance of IMP-8 measurements for the Understanding of Voyager Data

The SH-MOWG recognizes the importance and uniqueness of galactic cosmic
ray (GCR) measurements by IMP-8, and their particular value in
complementing Voyager measurements near and beyond the termination shock.
The IMP-8 GCR data are the only measurements of cosmic rays and solar
energetic particles, particularly protons and electrons, above ~40 MeV/n.
No such observations are available from ACE or any other spacecraft
currently in orbit.

These measurements are crucial to make use of cosmic ray studies presently
made by Voyager because they cover the energy range that is most affected
by heliospheric modulation effects. When Voyager crosses the termination
shock, the data are needed to quantify the heliospheric modulation during
this time-period, and relate the particle fluxes in the heliosphere to the
particles beyond the termination shock. The IMP-8 data is therefore a
necessary part of the Voyager exploration of the outer heliospheric
boundaries.

Therefore, the SH-MOWG finds that those IMP-8 measurements that are
necessary to support Voyager cosmic ray measurements should be continued,
provided that this can be done in a cost-effective fashion. It is
important that action be taken soon to preserve this asset, since IMP-8
will be lost if is not re-commanded in the very near future.

Also, the SH-MOWG finds an apparent lack of long-term cosmic ray
measurements in the energy range from 40 MeV/n to 1000 MeV/n planned
to follow the inevitable end of the IMP-8 mission. This should be
addressed in the long-term strategy of the missions and instrument
complements that are part of Sun-Earth-Connection studies. The
energetic particles in that energy are the most important contributors
of the radiation environment in the Earth’s vicinity.

—————————————————————————
2. First Announcement and Call for Abstracts for the April 2002 EGS General
Assembly Session ST17.2 “Thin Magnetospheric Boundaries “
—————————————————————————
From: Charles J. Farrugia (charlie.farrugia@unh.edu) and
Harald Kucharek (harald.kucharek@unh.edu)

Session ST17.2: Thin Magnetospheric Boundaries

Convener: C. J. Farrugia (charlie.farrugia@unh.edu)
Co-Convener: H. Kucharek (harald.kucharek@unh.edu)

Important physical processes within the coupled solar wind-magnetosphere-
ionosphere system are initiated in relatively thin transition regions.
These transition regions are often associated with strong gradients and
discontinuities in magnetic fields and plasmas reflecting the processes
of energy and momentum transfer taking place there. It has thus been an
ongoing major concern of space research to resolve these regions
observationally and to relate these observations to simulations and theory.
However, their small spatial extent and continuous motion make it even
more difficult to separate temporal from spatial variations and those pose
an observational challenge. In this session we would like to focus on
advances achieved in following 3 key regions:

(1) the bow shock,
(2) the plasma depletion layer, and
(3) the low latitude boundary layer, including the magnetopause.
(4) the plasma sheet boundary.

With the availability of multi-point observations from current missions,
such as Cluster II and the spacecraft of the International Solar-Terrestrial
Physics (ISTP) program, it is possible to advance substantially our
understanding of the structure of these layers. Multi-point observations
are a particularly powerful means of addressing the issues mentioned above.
Under favorable circumstances, observations are made simultaneously both
inside and outside these layers, allowing boundary conditions on the
processes occurring inside the layers to be established.

We solicit here observational, and theory/simulation work on the these
transition regions. Particularly welcome are contributions on what we
have learned in this field from theory, and from recent observations with
(1) the Geotail spacecraft, whose orbit “skims” many of these boundaries;
(2) the Interball-tail and Interball-aurora probes; (3) the Cluster II
suite of spacecraft; (4) the Polar spacecraft, and (5) in situ and ground
data during magnetic conjunctions.

Notice the ABSTRACT DEADLINE 11 January 2002

Details about how to submit an abstract and registration information can
be found on

www.copernicus.org/EGS/EGS.html

Please send an electronic copy of your abstract to charlie.farrugia@unh.edu
and harald.kucharek@unh.edu

Address information:

Convener and Co-Convener: Charles Farrugia/Harald Kucharek,
Space Science Center,
University of New Hampshire,
39, College Road
Morse Hall,
Durham, NH 03824,
USA.

Tel: +1-603-862-4596 (Farrugia);
+1-603-862-2735 (Kucharek)
Fax: +1-603-862-0311

charlie.farrugia@unh.edu harald.kucharek@unh.edu

—————————————————————————
3. First Announcement and Call for Abstracts for the April 2002 EGS General
Assembly Session ST2 “Space Weather”
—————————————————————————
From: Hannu Koskinen (Hannu.Koskinen@fmi.fi)

Session ST2 Space Weather

Convener: H. Koskinen (Hannu.Koskinen@fmi.fi)
Co-Convener: V. Bothmer (bothmer@linmpi.mpg.de)
T. Fuller-Rowell (tim.fuller-rowell@noaa.gov)
J. Lastovicka (jla@ufa.cas.cz)

During last few years space weather has stabilized its place as a vital
multidisciplinary topic within the solar-terrestrial physics. It has been
very successful in bringing together scientists interested in different
parts of the physical sequence from the Sun through solar wind and
magnetosphere down to the surface of the Earth and enhanced dialogue
between space science and engineering communities. In this symposium we
wish to strengthen this positive trend and encourage submission of
presentations that address the interconnections between various domains in
the solar-terrestrial environment, in particular, during the severe space
weather events around the recent solar maximum. Time will also be allocated
for presentations of international approaches to space weather systems.

Notice the ABSTRACT DEADLINE 11 January 2002

Details about how to submit an abstract and registration information can
be found on

www.copernicus.org/EGS/EGS.html

Please send an electronic copy of your abstract to Hannu.Koskinen@fmi.fi

—————————–
4. Storms in Space – the Book
—————————–
From: John Freeman

Dear Friends,

As some of you know I have been working on a book on space weather.
‘Storms in Space ‘ is now out. The book will be available for
examination at the Fall AGU meeting at the Cambridge University Press
booth. It can be ordered from Cambridge Press at the meeting or on
the web at uk.cambridge.org/earthsciences/catalogue/0521660386/, or
amazon.com, or barnesandnoble.com or any bookstore.

Storms in Space was written to tell general audiences the amazing and
beautiful story of space weather, however, it should be of interest
to specialists and it could be useful as a text in some courses. The
book includes a short Foreward by George Siscoe, an interview with
Joe Allen, a glossary and a mathematical appendix plus chapters on
the hazards of space storms for human systems and manned space
exploration.

John W. Freeman

****************************************************************************
* The SPA Section Newsletter is issued approximately twice weekly. *
* Current and back issues are available at *
* http://www-ssc.igpp.ucla.edu/spa/spanews.html *
* and at anonymous ftp site: igpp.ucla.edu; directory: /scratch/aguspa/ *
* *
* SPA Web Site: http://espsun.space.swri.edu/SPA/ *
* *
* Please direct all replies and submissions to the newsletter to: *
* Guan Le (Editor) – editor@igpp.ucla.edu *
* Fax: (301)286-1648 (Code 696, NASA/GSFC) *
* *
* To subscribe to the newsletter or just the table of contents, please *
* send your e-mail address to editor@igpp.ucla.edu and advise if you *
* prefer to receive the full newsletter or only the table of contents. *
* Please provide your full name as well. *
* *
* Please update your e-mail address if it has been changed. Please send *
* both your new and old e-mail address to the editor for easier updating *
* of your file. *
* *
****************************************************************************